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 Post subject: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 8th, 2009, 11:14 pm 
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The following thread is dedicated to all those people who have treated horses poorly, abusively, and cruelly or been caught cheating. It is just despicable to read about and sad that these poor horses have had to endure some of the things that they have. I wish I could rescue ALL of them myself!
:(


Animal Cruelty Found at Paragallo's Farm
By Tom Precious
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 4:35 PM
Investigators found serious violations of animal cruelty laws in at least 40 Thoroughbred horses at the New York farm owned by Ernie Paragallo following a raid April 8 by State Police and animal protection agency officials.

“It’s the worst Thoroughbred farm I’ve ever seen like this,’’ said Ron Perez, president of the Columbia-Greene Humane Society/SPCA, which conducted the investigation with the State Police.
The animal protection agency, which has the power to issue warrants and arrests, seized Paragallo’s Center Brook Farm following the execution of a search and seizure warrant.
“No horses can leave the farm right now. The horses are under our guidance for food and medical care. We dictate what gets done to those horses,’’ Perez told The Blood-Horse.
The raid included two veterinarians from the SPCA. They examined 40 horses, all of whom were treated in ways that violated the state’s animal cruelty laws, the SPCA president said.
“The animals had their bones sticking out, were extremely thin, wormy and many had skin infections and some had untreated injuries to their feet and eyes,’’ Perez said. He said Paragallo was not at the farm during the raid but described farm workers as “very cooperative.’’
Perez said criminal charges will be decided by the Greene County district attorney. He said each animal cruelty charge – of which there could be at least 40 – carry up to a year in jail and $1,000 fine apiece.
Perez said all the horses were Thoroughbreds. He did not know how many may have been involved in racing. He said stalls contained no bedding, including those holding mares with foals. He described many areas examined as being in poor condition, with broken fences sticking out that have injured some horses.
“It’s not nice, I can tell you that,’’ he said.
Perez said the farm has 170 horses. Forty were examined, but he said all the horses on the farm were “thin.’’ He said the horses ranged from yearlings to 20 years old. He said a scale that measures a horse’s body fat and weight gives a score from one to nine, with nine being overweight and one being as “thin as a horse can get.’’
“We had multiple horses that were scored two and one,’’ he said.
The state Racing and Wagering Board later said the farm's horse population totaled 177 Thoroughbreds, and that all showed various stages of malnourishment. The board, in a written statement, said the horses also had inadequate shelter and veterinarian care and vaccinations.
An investigator from the racing board was on the scene during the search of the farm and inspection of the horses. The board said it is running a related probe to determine if Paragallo should be able to keep his license with the state.
The board also announced that the New York State Breeding and Development Fund had frozen all incentive awards to Paragallo, Center Brook Farm, and Paraneck Stables. Racing board chairman John Sabini had requested the award money be halted pending the outcome of the investigations.
“I’m very gratified by the swift action of the State Police, the ASPCA ,and the Humane Society today because I know all New Yorkers – not just fans of Thoroughbred racing – have zero tolerance for the neglect of horses,” Sabini said.


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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 8th, 2009, 11:17 pm 
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That cobra venom will get ya every time! Personally I think justice has been served.


Stewart's Five-Year Suspension Upheld
By Ron Mitchell
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 3:26PM

A hearing officer has ruled that the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission acted properly when it handed a five-year suspension to veterinarian Dr. Rodney Stewart after cobra venom and other prohibited substances were found in a barn and in his truck at Keeneland in June 2007.

Hearing officer Robert Layton, who conducted a two-day hearing in December into Stewart’s appeal of the suspension, agreed with the KHRC attorneys on all aspects of the case, stating that the length of the suspension was long but “legally supportable” and that claims by the veterinarian’s attorneys that the property where the barn was located was not technically under regulatory supervision of the KHRC.

“The penalties issued for the September 17, 2007 stewards’ rulings support the commission’s mission of ensuring the safety and integrity of racing,” Layton concluded. (Read the complete findings here.)

Both parties have 15 days from the issuance of Layton’s ruling to file exceptions and recommendations with the KHRC executive director. The ruling also must be affirmed by the full KHRC, action that will likely occur at its May meeting. Also, a party may institute an appeal with Circuit Court within 30 days of the final order being mailed or delivered.

Karen Murphy, who along with Mike Meuser represented Stewart in his appeal, said she had not seen the opinion (“I fully expected I would provided a copy of the opinion before the press.”) but said it appeared to be a “rubber stamp” of the arguments and actions presented by the commission.

“I am very disappointed because if you had an impartial hearing officer (they) would have credited Dr. Stewart and against the commission on both the penalty and jurisdictional arguments,” Murphy said.

While statutorily the commission may have been able to take the action they did against Stewart, Murphy said there should be a correlation between penalty and the violations.

“In the real world, all of those things do matter and they matter precisely on the issue of penalty,” she said. “You don’t just penalize anyone with no precedent for it to the extent you have penalized Dr. Stewart when there is no indication of anything nefarious or no indication it was going to be used. The penalty should fit the facts. The penalty should have been adjusted to reflect those facts at a minimum.”

Since the hearing officer’s recommendation is not final until the full commission approves it, Murphy said she hopes her client will still prevail.

“The commission has the power and the responsibility to look at the facts and to address the issue of penalty and understand this is this man’s entire life. He served twice as long as Mr. Biancone has and I hope the commission will see the service of that suspension as being sufficient. It is my hope the commission will read the testimony and once they read it and understand it, they will see that the five-year penalty is excessive, unwarranted and will not sustain a legal challenge. They have the authority to accept, reject, or modify this. We are still hopeful."

The lengthy, high profile case stemmed from an inspection conducted June 22, 2007 at barns occupied by trainer Patrick Biancone at Keeneland Race Course and the Keeneland Training Center, located on Rice Road across from the main facility. During the inspection, a soft-sided cooler containing the prohibited substance cobra toxin was found in a refrigerator at Biancone’s barn at the training center. A search of a box in the back of Stewart’s truck on the main track premises contained carbidopa and levodopa, both considered Class A medication under Kentucky racing rules.

Chief state steward John Veitch testified that the inspection was a routine followup after a horse trained by Biancone had tested positive following a race at Churchill Downs.

Biancone, who was suspended for six months and agreed not to seek reinstatement for another six months, completed his suspension late last year.

Stewart was suspended for four years for possession of three sealed vials of alpha-cobratoxin, or cobra venom, a substance used to kill pain. Stewart was additionally suspended for one year for the possession of carbidopa and levodopa, both of which are used to treat Parkinson's disease in humans. The suspensions were to run consecutively, and he was also suspended for lesser offenses related to the case, with those suspensions to run concurrent to the longer suspensions.

During his appeal, Stewart testified that Biancone was unaware of the contents of the cooler and that although it belonged to him, the vet himself was unaware that it contained cobra toxin. Stewart’s attorneys attempted to show that any violations of Kentucky’s medication rules by their client were inadvertent and that there has been no evidence that he used or was attempting to use on horses any of the drugs for which he was suspended. The attorneys also questioned whether the barn where the cooler was found is actually on property under the racing commission’s jurisdiction.

Citing penalties permitted under the regulations Stewart violated and outlining the seriousness of the offenses, Layton said “the commission (and stewards acting on its behalf) are charged with nothing less than regulating Kentucky horse racing of the highest quality and free of any corrupt, incompetent, dishonest, or unprincipled horse racing practices and to regulate and maintain horse racing at race meetings in the commonwealth so as to dissipate any cloud of association with the undesirable and maintain the appearance as well as the fact of complete honesty and integrity of horse racing in the commonwealth.

“Nor is there any requirement in the regulatory framework for violations under this section that the commonwealth prove Dr. Stewart had a specific intent to cause such a racing result… such a high burden of proof would allow licensees to freely possess medications within the barn that could be freely used for the most dishonest or dangerous of reasons, so long as they were not caught specifically in the act of an illegal injection.”

Layton also rejected Stewart’s defense that the prohibited substances were there inadvertently, including statements that the cooler was only in the refrigerator because the veterinarian was storing items there because he was in the process of relocating to Saratoga Springs, N.Y., from Kentucky.

“A veterinarian who claims not to know what was in a medicine in his possession for treating animals, lacks credibility,” the hearing officer wrote. “And claims of ‘stupidity’ or ‘not thinking’ (the words chosen by Dr. Stewart) are not a sufficient basis for mitigation.”

Stewart was suspended indefinitely by the stewards Sept. 17, 2007, due to a determination that he had failed to cooperate in the investigation by failing to turn over records requested by the KHRC. That suspension was lifted and Layton determined it is moot after Stewart and his attorneys provided the requested material in December 2008. Because that suspension was lifted, Stewart resumed his practice in Saratoga.


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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 8th, 2009, 11:24 pm 
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Not the Sheik too!!! :shock:

Sheikh's Endurance Horse Tests Positive
By The Associated Press
Updated: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 8:21 AM
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 7:43 AM
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RSS ShareThisThe ruler of Dubai is being investigated by equestrian authorities after a horse he owns and rides failed drug tests after two races.

Sheik Mohammed said he was unaware of the drugs but accepts full responsibility. The drug use came to light following testing by his staff after endurance races this year in Bahrain and Dubai.

The International Equestrian Federation said April 7 it is investigating. The federation's president is Princess Haya of Jordan, who is married to Sheik Mohammed.

She has led a campaign for a drug-free sport and will step aside from her official duties when the governing body considers the case. Her husband is one of the world's leading breeders and owners of thoroughbred race horses.

The case is likely to go before the federation's seven-man tribunal, which has the power to impose a suspension.

Details of the case were published April 7 on the federation's Web site. A statement released by the emirate April 6 said: "Whilst completely unaware and utterly condemning the administration of these substances, His Highness has volunteered his acceptance that he is legally the person responsible."

His horse Tahhan tested positive for guanabenz — used to treat hypertension — after competing in 75-mile races at Bahrain in January and Dubai in February.

After the Bahrain race, the horse also had traces of 16b-hydroxy-stanozolol, a metabolite of stanozolol, an anabolic steroid used to build muscle and increase production of oxygen-carrying red blood cells.

It was used legally on 2008 Kentucky Derby winner Big Brown , but also by disgraced Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson during the 100-meter final at the 1988 Seoul Olympics.

Sheik Mohammed had his staff inform the federation when told of the positive cases and instructed his race results be voided, according to the Dubai statement. The federation said Sheik Mohammed waived his right for backup samples to be tested.

Princess Haya was elected federation president in 2006 and became an International Olympic Committee member a year later. Her office said she would defer the presidency during the case to second vice president Chris Hodson and she informed the IOC's ethics commission.

The 34-year-old princess has campaigned to clean up the sport after six horses failed doping tests at last year's Beijing Games.

She insisted on publicizing the Olympic cases and invited the head of the IOC medical commission to review sport's methods of treating horses and educating riders.

"We feel that we are a clean sport," she said in an interview with The Associated Press last week. "Unfortunately the cases we have had have been individually huge in profile. That has left an enormously bad taste among the general public, but it's certainly not reflective of our family. We have paid a very, very high price for actually trying to do the right thing."


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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 9th, 2009, 7:53 am 
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Well at least the Sheik took the high road by accepting full responsibilty and voiding his race results. Of course he may have been afraid that his wife would be so mad at him he wouldn't be getting any for a while too......



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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 9th, 2009, 10:37 am 
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Karen, I concur on the classiness of Sheik Mohammed. People can say what they want about his policies, and his "buying" of the Kentucky Derby, but I maintain that the man is full of class and the epitome of Sportmanship. I somehow can't imagine IEAH guys willingly voiding BB's wins for such an infraction.

However, remember that Sheik Mohammed has more than one wife. According to Wikipedia,
"His senior wife is Sheikha Hind bint Maktoum bin Juma Al Maktoum, his first cousin, whom he married in 1979. His junior wife is HRH Princess Haya bint Al Hussein, daughter of King Hussein of Jordan and half-sister of current King Abdullah II of Jordan, whom he married on April 10, 2004, and has one child, a daughter, AlJalila, born December 2, 2007.[2][3][4] Sheikh Mohammed has 19 children: eight sons and eleven daughters."

So, I doubt his concern was Princess Haya's anger, lol!



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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 9th, 2009, 12:19 pm 
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Oh well it was a good angle......... she's the youngest though.. could still be something there LMAO

Do you get the Bloodhorse Pedigree Weekly? (going sideways on the topic at hand, but I started getting it this week- cool info in it)



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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 22nd, 2009, 12:43 pm 
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Polo, not racing, but it doesn't sound like an accident, so I hope however is found to be responsible gets the book thrown at them. I find it hard to believe it was a shipment of tainted feed or medicine, because horses elsewhere would be dying of the same problem. I think someone poisoned the horses, and they deserve to rot in jail. I'm feeling pretty suspicious of the team's owner right now, he flew straight back to Venezuela after it happened.

Mystery at Fla. polo match: 21 horses die

By BRIAN SKOLOFF, Associated Press Writer Brian Skoloff, Associated Press Writer – Mon Apr 20, 7:08 pm ET

WELLINGTON, Fla. – Ladies in their spring dresses and men in casual linen suits sipped champagne and nibbled hors d'oeuvres as they waited for the U.S. Open polo match. What they ended up with was a field of death.

Magnificent polo ponies, each valued at up to $200,000, stumbled from their trailers and crumpled one by one onto the green grass. Vets ran out and poured water over the feverish, splayed-out animals. But it was no use. One dead horse. Then another. Then more. And within a day, 21 horses were dead.

State veterinarians were still performing necropsies but suspect the horses died from heart failure brought on by some sort of toxic reaction in their bodies. Possibly tainted feed, vitamins or supplements. Maybe a combination of the three.

While polo club officials and several independent veterinarians insisted the deaths appeared to be accidental, it remained a mystery that puzzled and saddened those close to a sport that has long been a passion of Palm Beach County's ultra-rich.

"The players, the owners of the horses were in tears. Bystanders and volunteers were in tears. This was a very tragic thing," said Tony Coppola, 62, an announcer for the International Polo Club Palm Beach in this palm tree-lined town some 15 miles west of the millionaire enclave of Palm Beach.

Spectators at the Sunday match had difficulty making out what was happening when the frenzy of workers and trucks hovered around the horse trailers. Soon blue tarps were hung and trailers were shuffled into place to obscure their view.

The match was canceled, replaced by an exhibition game, to keep the crowd busy. Rumors swirled and the death toll climbed.

Some horses died on scene. Others were shuttled to clinics for treatment, but there was nothing that could be done. Their fate was sealed.

All the dead horses were from the Venezuelan-owned team Lechuza Caracas, a favorite to win the title at what's described as the World Series of this sport. The team included about 40 thoroughbreds in all, maybe more. The team has not made any public comments since the deaths.

Polo club manager Jimmy Newman said it was like losing half the New York Yankees. "They lost some great horses," he said.

Dr. Scott Swerdlin, a veterinarian at Palm Beach Equine Clinic near the polo grounds, treated one of the sick horses. He said it appeared the animals died of heart failure caused by some kind of toxin that could have been in tainted food, vitamins or supplements.

"A combination of something with an error in something that was given to these horses caused this toxic reaction," Swerdlin said Monday.

It may take days or weeks to get the results of toxicology tests, he said.

John Wash, the polo club's president of club operations, said doctors had ruled out any sort of airborne infection. "This was an isolated incident involving that one team," Wash said.

"This was devastating," he added. "It was heartbreaking to see that many horses to get sick all at once."

He said games would resume on Wednesday, with the finals taking place Sunday. The Lechuza team has withdrawn, the club said.

The team is owned by affluent Venezuelan businessman Victor Vargas, who also plays, but most of the horses and players are Argentine. The team travels most of the year.

This is a town of horse clubs, training facilities, stables, polo grounds and wide open fenced fields where the animals roam and graze along straight-line, neatly groomed streets. The club has hosted the U.S. Open for seven years.

"It's just incredible. So unbelievable. The reaction throughout the polo community worldwide is one of disbelief. Disbelief and grief," said Coppola, the club announcer.

Although the value of the horses lost was great, this isn't a game people play for the money. The owners are already multimillionaires.

"You've got to have the money to part with," Newman said.

Purses rarely top a few thousand dollars, if any at all. They do it for the pride, for the glory, for the love of the game.

"If you win this tournament, you get your name on a trophy," Newman said. And the respect of your peers. That's pretty much it. "It's a lifestyle."


FOUL-PLAY PROBE LAUNCHED IN POLO-PONY DEATHS

Last updated: 2:04 am
April 22, 2009
Posted: 1:53 am
April 22, 2009

WELLINGTON, Fla. -- * Investigators have opened a criminal probe into whether someone poisoned 21 polo horses that died during preparations for the sport's top championship in Florida, officials said yesterday.

The horses from a Venezuelan-owned team began collapsing Sunday as they were unloaded from trailers at the International Polo Club Palm Beach, with some dying at the scene and others hours later at stables or clinics. State investigators believe the horses died from a drug reaction, toxins in their food or supplements, or a combination of the two.

While veterinarians run tests to determine what caused the deaths, law-enforcement officers are looking into whether criminal negligence, or perhaps something more sinister, could have been involved, said a spokesman for the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

"We want to make sure from a law-enforcement standpoint that there was no impropriety . . . no purposeful harm or laws violated in Florida," said department spokesman Terence McElroy.



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 Post subject: Re: Hall of Shame... >:-(
PostPosted: April 22nd, 2009, 3:05 pm 
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http://www.miamiherald.com/416/story/1012081.html

this link tells what the substance was given to the horses- Biodyl, a performance enhancer that is illegal in the US but used on these ponies all the time. Latest theory is that it got contaminated at the lab level- only 5 horses that did NOT get injections are not sick. One of the main components of this stuff is selenium which is a very dangerous product to mess with.



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PostPosted: April 22nd, 2009, 6:32 pm 
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karendeebee wrote:
http://www.miamiherald.com/416/story/1012081.html

this link tells what the substance was given to the horses- Biodyl, a performance enhancer that is illegal in the US but used on these ponies all the time. Latest theory is that it got contaminated at the lab level- only 5 horses that did NOT get injections are not sick. One of the main components of this stuff is selenium which is a very dangerous product to mess with.


Huh, that article wasn't out yet when I was searching for info. Still seems fishy though, wouldn't other horses outside the country be at risk of dying from it if it was the real deal from France? But I haven't heard anything... And it doesn't say whether the biodyl they used was made in a US lab by submitting a prescription. They said it was possible, but they didn't specify the origin...I'm going to be suspicious until the autopsies are back.



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PostPosted: May 2nd, 2009, 10:56 pm 
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I am heartbroken and disgusted that the Governor did NOT veto this bill...How tragic and scary for our local horses now (even more so than before). Why can't peole do the right thing. Horses are not bred for human consumption and there should NOT be a slaughter house just as a means of disposal or irresponsibility. They should implement shipping and hauling restrictions even more and they should also pay MUCH more stringents attention on not only the abusers, but in the reeding industry as well. The reverse mentality hits because the people think that the more stallions the more worht when in fact you can still have the same number of stallions BUT you can only breed them to a restricted number of mares per year and also only allow mares to become pregnant every other year. I realize they get good care but I think perhaps letting them have more recovery time than being impregnated again when they still have a foal at their side!!! There are SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO many alternateives to slaughter and I think that people should do MORE to prevent and provide alternatives to slaughter. I am so bummed to have seen this in the news after a fun-filled Derby day where all the horses came back to their stalls after the race. Bless the horsies...I wish that only the RIGHT people would LISTEN and DO MORE without ignoring what should be OBVIOUS responsibility...Just my two cents.



Montana horse slaughter bill becomes law

by Tim Nichols

A bill allowing the construction and operation of a horse-slaughter facility in Montana became law on Friday after Governor Brian Schweitzer declined to either sign or veto the bill.

Schweitzer had until Friday to make a decision on House Bill 418 after the state House of Representative and Senate both rejected amendments to the original law.

“The governor made his opinion on this bill known, the Legislature did the same,” Sarah Elliott, communication director for the governor’s office, told the Associated Press. “No action was taken and the bill now has become law.”

The new law, originally introduced by state Representative Ed Butcher (R-Winifred), offers the new horse-slaughter facility legal protection from anyone challenging the legality of the plant, including forcing anyone challenging the construction of the plant to post a bond equal to 20% of the estimated construction costs. Also, it would prohibit a court from issuing an injunction based on a challenge brought from the public.

On April 3, Schweitzer returned the bill to the state legislature with amendments that eliminated the special legal protection. On April 16, the Senate rejected the amendments by a 44-5 margin after the House voted against the amendments by a 59-41 margin on April 9.

Butcher said the plant would accept horses from out of state and all breeds. He said the selling of the horse meat would be determined by export certificates from the United States Department of Agriculture.

The last horse slaughter facility in the U.S. was shut down in DeKalb, Illinois by court order in 2007. The practice of slaughtering horses for human consumption in foreign countries remains prevalent in Canada and Mexico.

Tim Nichols is internet content editor of THOROUGHBRED TIMES


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PostPosted: May 5th, 2009, 12:20 pm 
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Dumb Asses! I dont have much more to say on this topic! Bunches of dumb asses!!! *Grrrrrrr*



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PostPosted: May 6th, 2009, 8:35 am 
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Well I guess now we really have to email and call and get co-sponsors for HR503. If it passes it will put an end to all of it because it will be illegal plain and simple.



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PostPosted: May 19th, 2009, 12:23 pm 
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Only two years?????? I wonder if they will stick him in a secluded cell and then let him starve for several months and feign ignorance by saying they didn't know anything about it??? Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!! That is the problem with getting any new animal enforcement laws to stick or be implemented...the crimes will never diminish because the penalty are almost non-existent! Makes me so mad sometimes!!!
:(


Paragallo faces two years in jail if convicted

by Paul Post

Prosecutors say horseman Ernest Paragallo faces a maximum two years in jail and fines totaling $22,000 if convicted of animal cruelty charges.

A legal conference scheduled Monday between prosecutors and Paragallo’s defense team has been postponed until June 22.

Paragallo, who is free on bail, was charged on April 10 with 22 counts of misdemeanor cruelty to animals after authorities seized 177 Thoroughbreds at his Center Brook Farm in Climax, New York, about an hour south of Saratoga Springs, New York.

"We’re going to be seeking a conviction," Greene County District Attorney Terry Wilhelm said Monday. "Criminal charges have been filed and we continue to prosecute these charges."

Paragallo has pleaded not guilty, but the New York State Racing and Wagering Board and New York Racing Association have stripped him of all racing privileges in the state.

Wilhelm said the maximum penalty for one count of animal cruelty is $1,000 plus one year of local jail time. Paragallo could be fined $1,000 for each count, but the most jail he could face would be two years. Under New York State law, multiple counts of equine animal cruelty are not considered a felony.

Columbia-Greene Humane Society has been overseeing the farm since the raid and veterinarians and volunteers are nursing horses back to health, a process that could take months. If convicted, Paragallo could be forced to make restitution, if applicable, and/or be subject to probation that includes anonymous, period inspections of his remaining horses.

"That’s a potential part of any sentence," Wilhelm said.

Paragallo’s attorney, Michael Howard of Hudson, New York, could not be reached for comment.

Columbia-Greene Humane Society President Ron Perez credited national media attention with helping find good new homes for horses.

"We were able to find some of the finest homes in the country," he said.

Paul Post is a New York-based THOROUGHBRED TIMES correspondent


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Columbia-Greene Humane Society has been overseeing the farm since the raid and veterinarians and volunteers are nursing horses back to health, a process that could take months. If convicted, Paragallo could be forced to make restitution, if applicable, and/or be subject to probation that includes anonymous, period inspections of his remaining horses.



Restitution absolutely. Every penny that it costs to make those horsees well should come out of his hide. Period inspections of remaining horses? WHAT? Why does he have remaining horses? Part of his sentence should be that he is never allowed to own another animal again. He should have to have a licence to let cockroaches in his jail cell.



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Courtesy of CNN:

Vick Leaves Prison for Home Confiement

Former Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick left a federal prison in Leavenworth, Kansas, early Wednesday, according to his publicist and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.


1 of 2 He will serve the last two months of his 23-month sentence in home confinement in Virginia, his publicist Judy Smith said. He is a native of Newport News, Virginia.

Vick, 28, pleaded guilty in August 2007 to a federal charge of bankrolling a dogfighting operation at a home he owned in Virginia.

He will return to professional football as soon as September if reinstated by the NFL, according to the sports agent who negotiated Vick's 10-year, $140 million contract with the Falcons.

Meanwhile, Vick's attorneys have said he will work at a Newport News construction firm following his release, and he has also agreed to participate in a documentary for $600,000.

Last month, a federal bankruptcy judge denied a Chapter 11 bankruptcy plan presented by Vick, urging him to offer the court another plan to emerge from bankruptcy. The plan called for Vick to come up with $750,000 to $1 million in cash to be paid to creditors, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Frank Santoro said, but added he saw no evidence Vick could come up with that much. Santoro suggested Vick's next plan not call for him to keep two houses and three cars, as did the rejected proposal.

In testimony, Vick acknowledged committing a "heinous" act and said he should have acted more maturely. He said he has been earning 12 cents an hour as an overnight janitor in prison. His Falcons salary, he said, was between $10 million and $12 million. He acknowledged failing to handle his money well.

Vick plans to work with the Humane Society of the United States on anti-dogfighting campaigns, Humane Society President Wayne Pacelle told CNN on Tuesday. Vick will work on programs aimed at preventing youths from getting involved in dogfighting, and also on programs to assist young people who have already been involved in the blood sport.

Pacelle said the Humane Society was approached by Vick's representatives. He said he has traveled to Kansas twice to meet with the former quarterback, and during the second visit, the two discussed how Vick could use his sway over youths to discourage them from involvement in dogfighting, as well as help those who were apprehended in connection with it. Watch more about Vick's dogs »


Details have not yet been hammered out, Pacelle said, but will be in the next couple of days.
More attention has been paid to dogfighting as a result of Vick's case, Pacelle said. The Humane Society, which offers rewards for tips involving dogfighting, has recently paid out $40,000 in five different cases, he said.


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